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How to deal with accidentally getting too high

Pretty much anyone who uses weed frequently has experienced the accidental discomfort of getting a little too stoned. It can happen to even the most seasoned of smokers. Conventional wisdom suggests there’s not much that can be done when you get too high, you simply have to wait it out. Generally speaking, that’s pretty true, but whether you’re new to cannabis or want some new tricks, here are some clever ways to deal with getting too baked:

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  1. Learn from the experience. Ok, I had to make this number one because the best way to deal with getting too high is to take precautionary steps to not get too high in the first place. There’s not (yet) exactly one surefire way to come down immediately from THC, so while the next steps offer some common hacks, remember that the number one trick is prevention.
  2. Drink water! Drymouth is no joke, and drinking extra water will aid your body in the process of flushing out the excess cannabinoids. Try adding lime or lemon or some electrolytes!
  3. Get distracted. It might seem difficult at first, especially if you’re experiencing a mind-racing type of effect. Regardless, if you can find a way to distract yourself from the feeling of being super super stoned, or find a way to ease into it, you won’t even notice the effect anymore. Sometimes, if you’re really stoned, it can be hard to even think of a clever distraction. Some ideas are: calling a friend and having small talk, watching the movie or reading the book you’ve been meaning to get around to, taking a long walk outside, try drawing or painting, listening to music, or eating food. Which brings me to the next point:
  4. Eat something! Certain foods, like mangos, are believed to enhance rather than subdue, a high. But as a frequent flyer myself, whenever I eat something I tend to be less-high after, especially for larger meals. Heavier foods seem to work best. Spring for sandwiches or wraps, protein items, or anything with rice. Once you’re done eating, the high will feel much more manageable.
  5. Try CBD. Seriously. It might seem odd to counteract a THC-overdose with more cannabis, but there are several scientific studies, and plenty of anecdotal evidence, suggesting that CBD can be a “cure” for being wayyyyyyy too high. However, one recent study showed that adding CBD to THC flowers in a vaporizer actually caused new users to report feeling a little more stoned than a pure THC mixture. The findings are limited, because typically, CBD is administered several minutes, or potentially several hours, after initial consumption of THC. The theory is that CBD and THC both interact with cannabinoid receptors, and by using the CBD second, it’s able to modulate and buffer some of the initial psychoactivity of THC.
  6. Rebounding off of #2, start making a playlist for your favorite songs that you’ll listen to if you get too high again. Music can be extremely comforting, and while you distract yourself by exploring soothing music this time, you’ll have a playlist of comfort ready in case it ever happens again.
  7. Practice strategies you use for coping with stress in your day-to-day life. Stress, anxiety, and sometimes even paranoia aren’t only side-effects from THC, they’re also common emotions we experience in our day-to-day lives. And, while many people feel helplessly not-in-control of their emotional processes, learning to combat the intense anxiety caused by overconsuming THC can potentially help you develop strategies (such as deep breathing, mindful thinking, or stress toys) to implement even when you’re not too high.

Hopefully some of these tips are helpful the next time you find yourself feeling too baked. But just remember, THC is relatively short-lived, with a maximum effect for about 2-hours when inhaled. Plus, one of the amazing things about weed is that you’re never in actual danger from consuming too much THC. So, try to relax and enjoy the short ride!

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